Our previous education campaign, Zero to Hero, was so popular that we decided to make a brand new one! Forex 101 is a Forex trading course designed to help even absolute beginners learn how to trade. The training course is absolutely free and 100% online. Each lesson will feature a video, written notes and a follow-up quiz. The course will be split over 3 steps - `Beginner`, `Intermediate` and `Advanced`. The world of Forex trading awaits... Are you ready for class?


Beginners in forex have peculiar needs. It takes approximately 18 months of consistent coaching, mentoring and practice to be able to cross from the realm of being a beginner to the realm of being an intermediate-level trader. This fact was put across by the CEO of a UK-based proprietary trading firm. The question is: what does the beginner do for the 18 months that it will probably take to make that transition? A lot of practice on demo and live accounts as well as a lot of study of all kinds of materials that range from the actual trading process, to trader psychology will have to be done. 

The platforms offered by Admiral Markets include MetaTrader 4 (MT4) and MetaTrader 5 (MT5) and MetaTrader WebTrader. MT4 and MT5 are both available for Windows, Mac, Android and iOS devices (for iPhone and iPad). In addition, Admiral Markets also provides traders with an enhanced version of MetaTrader, known as MetaTrader Supreme Edition. With access to all this software, Forex can be traded from anywhere in the world - and all you need is an internet connection.
This platform from Spotware Systems is a trading platform that introduces beginners to ECN trading conditions. It goes hand-in-hand with the cAlgo, which is the platform used to build algorithms used on the cTrader. The cTrader enables the trader to make multiple exits on a forex position, and also allows the viewing of the market depth on a broker’s order books. The beginner can also perform deposit and withdrawal transactions within the platform interface.
U.S. President, Richard Nixon is credited with ending the Bretton Woods Accord and fixed rates of exchange, eventually resulting in a free-floating currency system. After the Accord ended in 1971,[31] the Smithsonian Agreement allowed rates to fluctuate by up to ±2%. In 1961–62, the volume of foreign operations by the U.S. Federal Reserve was relatively low.[32][33] Those involved in controlling exchange rates found the boundaries of the Agreement were not realistic and so ceased this[clarification needed] in March 1973, when sometime afterward[clarification needed] none of the major currencies were maintained with a capacity for conversion to gold,[clarification needed] organizations relied instead on reserves of currency.[34][35] From 1970 to 1973, the volume of trading in the market increased three-fold.[36][37][38] At some time (according to Gandolfo during February–March 1973) some of the markets were "split", and a two-tier currency market[clarification needed] was subsequently introduced, with dual currency rates. This was abolished in March 1974.[39][40][41]
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